05
Dec

In contrast to Far East buildings made from stone, wood or mud and distinguished mainly by their heavy and rotund nature, today we discover an oriental-style building which is surprising precisely because of its change of tack regarding choice of materials.

The light and play of transparencies achieved with modern materials and reflective pools at the Huaxin Business Center coexist with one of the basic principles of traditional Chinese architecture: the importance of the horizontal plane (many people will recall the large oriental loggias built on heavy platforms covered with a large floating roof).

teahouse_waterfallScenic Architecture Office designed and completed a teahouse and exhibition centre for China Fortuna Land Development and shored up this building identity: the highly landscaped raised positioning of the construction on the ground. Innovation was incorporated into the project in the choice of materials: shiny and stunning.

The building comprises four interconnected suspended modules with bridges (from which waterfalls flow) at a height that allows users to enjoy nature because the architects not only painstakingly respected the six camphor trees they found on the land but even made them part of the project.

As well as gaining height, they managed to maximise the available green space on the land and reduce the building’s impact on the tree roots. To support the entire project, they used just 10 pieces of steel and concrete which they inserted into the ground around the sole closed space on the ground floor. This is a transparent atrium that visually maximises the environment, harnesses the natural light and provides access to the first floor.

teahouse_interior

The building comprises four interconnected suspended modules with bridges (from which waterfalls flow) at a height that allows users to enjoy nature because the architects not only painstakingly respected the six camphor trees they found on the land but even made them part of the project.

As well as gaining height, they managed to maximise the available green space on the land and reduce the building’s impact on the tree roots. To support the entire project, they used just 10 pieces of steel and concrete which they inserted into the ground around the sole closed space on the ground floor. This is a transparent atrium that visually maximises the environment, harnesses the natural light and provides access to the first floor.

teahouse_trees

Photos: © Su Shengliang